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heard, the bill will be placed on the calendar. mr. reid: mr. president, i congratulate diane skarvalo on her retirement after 20 years of dedicated service as a senate curator. every day people across this country and we who work in this great building, including students on filled trips, dignitaries, staffers alike appreciate the historic treasures stored in the hallways of this capitol. these works of fine art and craftsmanship are symbols of our democracy and for two decades diane has been the steward of these treasures. i thank her for her dedication and wish her the best in her future endeavors. i ask consent a more complete statement be made part of the record as if given. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. reid: mr. president, i'm gratified we were able to get enough votes to begin debate on the flood insurance bill. senators menendez and landrieu worked closely with the republican cosponsors to get the bill this far. we have a long time -- we've been trying to get this for a long, long time. we're very close to a ask conse- we're very close to a consent agreement wi
. >> somebody besides me actually do care. >>> fear. nbc's diane sawyer with the store that changed so much. from all over the country your overwhelming support and one surprising celebrity who took the message to heart. ♪ started from the bottom now we here ♪ ♪ started from the bottom now the whole team here ♪ >> "started from the bottom" singer drake with a gift that shocked them all. >> this is about you. this is about your principal. this is about your future. >> now they get some much-needed help but the battle isn't over yet. just another year at strawberry mansion. >> this special edition of "nightline," tears to triumph, >>> this is a special edition of "nightline," tears to triumph, two years at strawberry mansion. >> good evening. and thank you for joining us at the end of this long holiday weekend. as we celebrate the life of martin luther king jr. tonight, we're taking another look at a school that was considered one of america's most dangerous. switchblades and fistfights a daily concern. philadelphia's strawberry mansion high school was on the brink of closure, with th
. >>> good evening, and thanks for joining us. i'm diane dwyer. a fire destroyed a popular restaurant in san jose in a matter of four minutes. firefighters say the coffee shop and restaurant was overrun by flames and smoke. nbc bay area's kimberly tere's in san jose with the latest. kimberly? >> reporter: diane, fire crews are still out here at this hour. just a short while ago, they were spraying down the gutted restaurant, making sure any smoldering embers are put out. the four-alarm fire, which caused all of this damage, started just before 6:30 this morning. some workers were inside getting the restaurant ready to open when the chef says the wall started shaking. he walked around the kitchen, and that's when he says he saw the flames. knowing it was spreading quickly and beyond what he and his co-workers could handle, paquin ran across the street to a fire station asking for help, but by that time it was already too late, in a matter of minutes, fueled in part by grease in the kitchen, the fire took over and destroyed the building. multiple sections of the roof collapsed. >> we've all be
us. i'm diane dwyer. >>> we begin with a developing story. the san jose fire department tonight is urging people to be on high alert. that's following a string of fires in the downtown area, including one early this morning. investigators believe most of the fires were deliberately set. nbc bay area's kimberly tere joins us from the scene of one of the fires with more on the investigation and a sketch of the possible suspect. >> reporter: diane, this is actually the sketch released by investigators today of a person of interest. it is based on witness descriptions, and also on images taken from surveillance video cameras in the areas where the fires were started. the most recent fire actually started this morning, just before 4:30 a.m. san jose firefighters say it was a jogger who alerted them to the fire, by banging on the door of their station, which is actually very close to the home which was on fire near the intersection of east st. john and 17th street. a couple in their 70s were inside the home. but firefighters say neighbors were able to alert them and they were able to
. >> reporter: she signed a $4 million book deal and told her story to diane sawyer. >> to get to it, did you ki kill meredith kercher? >> no. >> were you there that night? >> no. >> do you know anything that you have not told police? that you have not told in this book? >> no, i don't. i wasn't there. >> but just as knox was beginning her new life again, italy's highest court overturned her acquittal last year. she couldn't believe it. >> i'm going to keep fighting this. i'm going to keep fighting this and i'm not going to stop fighting this. that's all. the truth will come out and that's all. >> in fact, one truth that is known is that this man, local drifter rudy guede is in jail, convicted for the murder. >> he sits in 16 years in prison. and i might add with good behavior, he's allegeable and will probably receive daytime release this year. so while amanda and raffaele is being convicted trial after trial after trial, the real killer is going to be out of jail. they searched that crime scene for two months and they were not able to find one nanogram of amanda knox's dna. >> are you excited
people with temperatures plunging below zero throughout the region. diane. >> how does that happen? that so many power lines stayed intact? >> reporter: well, this storm occurred in temperatures that were so cold, that the snow that fell was light and fluffy. unlike that blizzard almost a year ago, which was very heavy and wet. and that meant it did not bring down power lines, very fortunate for a lot of people tonight. diane. >> from the snow bank in boston, thank you so much, ron claiborne. light and fluffy or not all that weather had a ripple effect on travel across the country. 9,000 flights delayed or cancelled. abc's linzie janis with the families camped out at the airport. >> reporter: at airports across the country, passengers sprawled out, sleeping in chairs, on window sills, some lucky enough to snag a cot. >> horrible. never do it again. >> we were patient and hoping for the best, unfortunately we spent the night in the chapel. >> reporter: dozens slept on these camp beds, the doors opening all night long and letting freezing air in, all they had was this thin blanket to
begin with abc's gio benitez in chicago where it is piling up. gio. >> reporter: it sure is, diane. good evening to you from a snowy chicagoland. it's getting colder and colder. 12 degrees right now. it feels like two below zero. this stuff isn't just fluffy. it's downright relentless. from blaring sirens in evanston, illinois, alerting residents to a snow emergency, to a chicago whiteout, up to 18 inches of fresh snow in places. the midwest is a blowing, snowing, deep freeze. officials too, sounding a warning. >> we ask that residents check on the well-being of residents, friends and neighbors. >> reporter: the city's full fleet of 287 snow plows and salt spreaders dominate the streets. snow plows in nearby rosemont out in force, too, looking like a choreographed ballet. drivers operating on little sleep, a grueling job as we found out. >> when it gets heavy, you just keep going and going and going. >> that's what we do. if you left it build up, you'll never move it. >> reporter: lyle richmond knows that, clearing the snow from his house, over and over again. >> four times within the pa
meteorologist ginger zee starts us off with the big picture. ginger? >> diane, that big picture is a wickedly cold one. even here in new york city, where we started the morning in the 50s, we're going to drop to the single digits by tomorrow morning. and look at that. the width of this cold. all the way through the northern rockies, to iowa, through the gulf coast. and even miami will get cold tonight. life-threatening, school closing, record-breaking cold. >> that's incredibly cold air in western iowa. >> we've got brutal cold everywhere you go. >> it's still going to feel like 20, 25 degrees below zero. >> reporter: the scenes from our sub zero nation are stunning tonight. from zero visibility in michigan to the tundra once called ohio. it was a don't go outside day in kansas city. chicagoans renaming their land chiberia. lake michigan's steaming as temps bottomed out at a record-breaking 16 below zero. the governor of illinois declaring a state of emergency. and in indiana, one day after a major snow, a state of disaster and a severe warning from the governor. >> if you can stay in today,
is now in the midst of its worst drought since the gold rush, and diane, these are the results. >> thanks so much, david. and, as you know, tonight, catholic bishops across california are asking people of all faiths to come together to pray for rain. >>> and now, we turn to the big headline overseas, in russia, a rare interview. abc's george stephanopoulos with the brash president vladimir putin on the eve of the olympic games, and today, putin talked about everything from gay athletes to terror and security. george was the only american journalist with him. george? >> reporter: diane, president putin has not done an american broadcast interview in years. but these games are important to him. he's doing everything that he can to make sure they're successful and safe and security is the number one challenge. for 15 years, he's held an iron grip on power, a showman, eager to show off for the world. whether he's hang gliding, hitting judo opponents or riding horses. now, putin is eager to show the world his russia. but today, when asked whether gay visitors will be welcomed in sochi, despite
>>> good evening, and v( nks for joining us. i'm diane dwyer.xd well, tonight much of the bay area and the pacific northwest is buzzing. andt(xd even though the rivalry between the niners and the seahawks is recent, that doesn't -9 it's not serious.e1 we have team coverage tonight with mindi bach of comcast sportsnet up in qseattle, but first let's go to nbc bay area's monte francis. he's in san francisco and the city is not takingÑi any chance tonight, monte. >> reporter: good evening.q u$a. muni is getting ready f/%y tomorrow by makin'( some chang toe1 its service. now, in the past celebrating fans have been known to climb on top of street cars and get very close to these overhead wires which are charged with electricity. gency is taking some of its street cars and alsoi] its cable cars outñr of service. the historic street cars on the f market line will not run tomorrow sook the overhead wire that power them can be turned off. also thet( iconic cable car lin starting tomorrow afternoon. safety is a concern,xdt( but sop vandalism, like w9u went crazyçói] after the 2012 w s
in the last dozen years or so, diane. >> tell me more about what the u.s. is doing with these warnings coming in? >> reporter: there will be small teams of armed u.s. personnel assigned to watch over athletes. as well, the pentagon said today, they made contingency plans to get americans out of there in a hurry, if they have to, including two u.s. navy ships that will be on scheduled deployment on the nearby black sea. >> thank you, brian. >>> and our next big story in the news tonight, it is back. the brand-new polar plunge about to hit the midwest and the northeast with snow, ice, and bone-chilling temperatures again. abc's meteorologist, ginger zee, now, with the icy rescues already under way. >> reporter: a suspenseful rescue on a lake in missouri. firefighters making their way to a man trapped in the frigid waters. all that drama on the ice after the recent bout of mild air. and it all comes to an end tonight. in roanoke, virginia, they are getting ready for a plowable snowstorm. winter storm warnings in place from western north carolina to parts of connecticut. and behind it? a surge fr
it's not just the people in the government raided diane nash, diane nash is one of my favorite people from the civil rights era and some of you may know her. she was the leader of the citizens in the freedom rides. her family was harassed at the fbi and in one of my interviews with her i said diane, i showed her the fbi documents about what they had done petty little things. she said i don't bother with that. that was just hoover. she said yes but i blame us for hoover. we left him in the position of arbitrary secret power for 50 years and anybody who studies american government in the sixth grade should know you are going to get just what you got, an autocrat whose world was small and wanted to run things. i blame us so here is diane nash who is lacking cannot vote herself that she is assuming responsibility for j. edgar hoover instead of a sense of victimhood. so that is an amazing example to me of the kind of wisdom that these young people -- she was only 23 years old when she was doing all this up with j. edgar hoover so there's a lot of wisdom here and there are no easy answers b
, we're seeing 12 inches of snow. but, diane, this is where the most snow fell, more than 18 inches. >> 18 inches. thank you, gio. >>> as gio knows, it's happened so often this winter, thousands and thousands of flights canceled and delayed. hitting everyone all across the country, coast-to-coast, and not just in the frozen zone. abc's reena ninan, now, on the fight to get all those planes flying again. >> reporter: the second, big storm for the northeast in two weeks, turned tarmacs into tundras. just listen. we got a firsthand look at the all-out runway war at dulles airport. this multifunction snowplow behind me clears the runway. it has three devices. a snowplow that moves the snow, a broom, and then, a snowblower. across america over the past 48 hours, more than 7,300 flight delays. and over 5,000 cancellations. frozen northeast hubs, some of america's busiest airports, causing a ripple effect of passengers stranded nationwide. from maine -- >> most of the flights are canceled already. >> reporter: all the way to los angeles. >> i was wondering if i would be able to reroute tha
south. diane eastabrook in is chicago, but we begin with jonathan betz. i understand the weather already having a major impact on the commute. >> yeah, without question because it is so cold dell. this storm system is not bringing a lot of snow or ice, just these frigid cold temperatures. in new york city it is hovering around zero degrees. you add in the wind chill, and it feels like 20 to 25 below zero. not since 1896 has it been this cold in new york city. a record because of this be iter cold air moving through early today. amtrak canceling dozens of trains today because of the cold weather actually had several trains stranded in northern illinois because of the snow the system brought up there. close to 500 passengers had to sleep in the trains overnight, because the trains could not move because of all of the though on the tracks. earlier today, amtrak brought in buses and bussed those people to chicago. close to 2400 flights canceled across the united states today. jet blue made the unusual move of canceling many of its flights for 17 hours to basically reset its system. it affect
of the other stories. one of which being the extreme cold out there. diane eastabrook is standing by in a suburb of chicago. diane it is extremely cold and very dangerous out here. >> it is. it is a little warmer than it was yesterday. we're hoping to get above zero, hopeful in a couple of hours, but the big problem is hyperthermia, frostbite those kind of things. now we have checked with area hospitals, and they have reports of about 20-weather related injuries in the last couple of days, fewer than half of those are hypothermia and frostbite. the other injuries have been slips and falls and that sort of thing. there have been in the last day or so, four heart attacked reported from people out shovelling snow. one of the big fears is people out on the highways. more people are returning to work today, and the roads are slicker than they were yesterday. there's a lot of black ice. so we did see some accidents yesterday, and people going into emergency rooms being treated for those kinds of injuries, so our guess is question could see more of that today. there was a stretch that wa
the team. >>> nbc bay area news starts now. >>> good evening and thanks for joining us. i'm diane dwyer. >>> a serial arsonist is on the loose in the south bay. there have been ten fires in less than a week, all in downtown san jose. police are hoping a new $10,000 reward will make the difference. kimberly terry is at the scene of the latest fire with more for us. >> reporter: authorities say they have grave concerns for public safety and also for the firefighters who are risking their lives to fight this rash of suspicious fires which have been moving fast, growing very quickly. the $10,000 reward is being offered by the san jose firefighters union for any information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person or persons responsible. neighbors who live on east st. john and 17th woke up just before 4:30 this morning to massive flames. >> i went to the back and i came outside and there was a fire in the back. so i came over here right away and tried to get them out. >> reporter: a couple in their 70s were inside sleeping but escaped unharmed. according to investigators, this is t
that are often left out of team sports, but there is a tournament just for them and as diane reports, the goal is about more than winning or losing. >> reporter: inside the guards icehouse in laurel, maryland, is a hockey tournament that if given a chance shows the world special needs players have just as much drive and dedication as anyone. >> yea, kaiden! >> reporter: 300 players on 20 teams representing 10 states. >> hi, mom! >> reporter: are here for the third annual uct winter hockey festival. sam smith has played in each tournament. he's been a member of the washington ice dog says of the american special hockey -- dogs of the american special hockey association for 14 years. >> what i like about it is the fact that i can really skate. i can hit the notes right on the ice with slapshots, not slapshots, wrist shots i meant and good pass says and speeding up and down the ice -- passes and speeding up and down the ice to score or get an assist. >> reporter: sam who has asperger's is captain of the ice dogs a team. >> do a great job right here. he shoots. saved! >> reporter: the 29-year
, in this freezing cold. and abc's meteorologist ginger zee starts us off. ginger? >> reporter: you know, diane, we've all been dealing with this relentless cold. so, we've all known that from the trenches out here. but if you add some snow, and i'm talking two feet of snow, and then, wild winds, and this is what you get, some of the worst in the country. inside the blinding blizzard, 50-mile-per-hour wind gusts. and 24, the number of inches of snow falling in erie county, new york, in the past 24 hours. they are expecting up to five feet by the end of the week. it is the snowiest place in america today. >> here in the town of hamburg, there are drifts that are actually above my knee. >> reporter: but as we all know, the major headline is the ridiculous cold. >> very cold. very cold. >> reporter: as 16 states saw windchills of 40 below or lower. and then, there's this astonishing number. 61, the number of hours minneapolis, minnesota, spent below zero. not below freezing. below zero. and here's a familiar site. so many americans doing that perilous plunge. 51, that's the number of degrees new york
the way through friday. this cold really doesn't break until the end of the weekend. diane, i have my electric gloves all ready for this big polar air mass. >> going to take a closer look at those when you get back, ginger. thank you. >>> with all that cold we want to show you tonight something happening we've not seen before. the great lakes freezing up at a fast clip. abc's alex perez in a kind of 21st century ice age, showing us. >> reporter: it looks more like the north pole than the midwest. this endless pool of ice is lake michigan, captured by a camera on a drone, flying high above. >> it's just massive. >> reporter: last year, only 38% of the great lakes were frozen over. this year, researchers predict the ice coverage to be almost double that for january and february. coast guard petty officer brad houston says the extra ice has kept them busy, responding to calls all season. a lot of people will see this ice and think, i can stand on this. but your hand goes right through. >> yep. exactly. they fall straight through. >> reporter: another unexpected side-effect of the arctic
for help. >> it's trash collection day. diane pulls cans back to the house and shows us why she got mad. >> the ordeal began a year ago. her husband mailed in their quarterly payment of $77. >> we assume payment had been credited the next statement said they never paid. >> and my husband contacted waste manment and told that the check bounced. >> so diane got a copy of the check in fact it shows payment did clear, and waste management cashed it. >> so we sent it to waste management to show them that that payment had been already paid. >> they figured that would settle things the next statement said they still oweked money. >> i said we have proof that that check had been paid by bank of america. >> however, waste management said it never saw the check. diane sent another copy. >> so by then, it's been six months. and each time i speak to someone different. >> waste management told diane the bank would have to send a copy along with a letter verifying it's real. so, she did that, too. >> it was fast from bank of america. >> that wasn't enough. >> they said they didn't have it, they never
't believe them. >> they came to michael finney for help. >> it's trash collection day. diane pulls cans back to the house and shows us why she got mad. >> the ordeal began a year ago. her husband mailed in their quarterly payment of $77. >> we assume payment had been credited the next statement said they never paid. >> and my husband contacted waste manment and told that the check bounced. >> so diane got a copy of the check in fact it shows payment did clear, and waste management cashed it. >> so we sent it to waste management to show them that that payment had been already paid. >> they figured that would settle things the next statement said they still oweked money. >> i said we have proof that that check had been paid by bank of america. >> however, waste management said it never saw the check. diane sent another copy. >> so by then, it's been six months. and each time i speak to someone different. >> waste management told diane the bank would have to send a copy along with a letter verifying it's real. so, she did that, too. >> it was fast from bank of america. >> that wasn't enough. >>
can see, diane, tonight, completely frozen over. diane? >> strangely beautiful, too. thank you, alex. >>> i want to bring in abc's meteorologist, ginger zee, for a look ahead. ginger? >> there's winter storm warnings that have just gone up, from texas to far southern maryland. and warning means it's imminent. happening now. snow and ice. and how much we expect tomorrow. that's tuesday into wednesday, for most folks. that low slides across. it is plenty cold. and we are in that three-inch to six-inch range in the white. anywhere pink or maroon, that's more than a half-foot of snow. and then, there will be the ice. this will make it extra messy, especially from southeastern georgia up through south and north carolina. something we're going to be watching, especially for these towns that just aren't used to it. they either don't have plows or salt. or places like houston just have sand to put on some of the icy places. >> for a moment, ginger, look ahead to the super bowl. are you still predicting temperatures in the 30s? >> yes. it looks like the moderating trend gets on by the end of
these to the places where they're most needed. diane? >> as you were saying, steve, it's once in a generation. thank you. >>> so, is there any relief in sight? let's go to abc's meteorologist, ginger zee, now, with the answer. ginger? >> diane, that's the question everyone is asking. as you see the ice chunks floating on the hudson river behind me, i have an answer. yes, relief is in sight. but we've got to get through that storm first. let's talk about it, as that low pressure system slides across the southeast. it will eventually pull away tomorrow morning. you can see the coastal carolinas getting a little of the snow and freezing rain mix. and then, it is the windchill that settles in. that's going to be the headline early for so many people. really, the eastern two-thirds of the nation, that's the brunt of the cold. and yes, that white color is zero, dipping into the deep south. but places like atlanta, that will struggle to make it to freezing, as we go into your wednesday, will be 60 by the weekend. diane? >> okay. thank you, ginger. and also, to steve again. >>> as we said, we are here in a
. without families this city dies or morris into a winn and diane for adults like venice italy >> thank you, sir your time is up. >> my name is a michael i'm with the park merry kidney coalition. i'm concerned this houshz element didn't taking into consideration the need for transit before development. i've been very frustrated by what is coming from park merced i understand the plans call for an increase in something like 84 units and the cumulative impact of the environmental impacts is not being considered. my children have taken public transportation and continuing been frustrated by the muni to get into bart from where you live you have to take a shuttle and that lines wines around the san francisco buildings and 85 new cars will be added to park merced. tdr there isn't any southern for transit before development. i know the need for affordable housing but in getting rid of the affordable housing in san francisco sate and putting rent control at peril even denying has said you can't guarantee that rent control will be here so your driving first names out of the city. there's all kinds
in the government, it's me. diane nash, diane nash is one of my favorite people from the civil rights era. some of you may know her. but she was a leader of the sit-ins, the freedom rides, everything. she was, her family was harassed by the fbi, and in one of my interviews with her i said, diane, i showed her some of these fbi documents about what they'd done, petty little things, and she says, oh, i don't bother with that, that was just hoover. i said, what do you mean? he said, yes, but i blame us for hoover. we left him in a position of arbitrary secret power for 50 years, and anybody who studies american government in the sixth grade should know you're going to get just what you got, an autocrat whose world was small and wanted to run things. i blame us. so here's diane nash who's black and cannot vote herself, but she's assuming responsibility for j. edgar hoover instead of a sense of victim hood. and so that is an amazing example to me of the kind of wisdom that these young people -- she was only 23 years old when she's doing all this stuff with j. edgar hoover. so there's a lot of wisdom
, what's next, hodi? >> diane keaton, i don't know if you saw her at the golden globes, giving the award to woody allen, who was not there. >> he was with you. he was at the carole king broadway musical "beautiful". >> diane got up, gave her speech and a commercial came on, a l'oreal commercial and you can see diane keaton in that commercial. now, a twitter storm erupted as it tends to do. and they wondered if she was airbrushed, or is it amazing lighting or what did l'oreal do to change the look of diane keaton. >> thank you. 68 years old, proudly, and has been with l'oreal for a long time, 2006. i remember, there is lots of other ladies that are over a certain age, and you and a applaud l'oreal for using women a little more seasoned. >> it is called good lighting. any of us know and we know and we have proven it, you can sit and have great lighting and then all of a sudden the lights can go down or off or something -- >> or a weird angle. i promise you this, even gisele bundchen in bad light does not look good. lighting is everything. >> the bottom line is l'oreal is one of the few com
you. >>> as we said earlier the u.s. is dealing with some crippling temperatures. diane -- wow you look hold, how are you holding up out there? >> i'm barely holding up here. we saw 16 below zero here in chicago, with wind chill around 40 and 50 below zero, that forced the closure of schools all over illinois, and other states. the city of chicago has crews out working overtime, some of these crews are working double time clearing off streets so that is going to cost the city of chicago a bundle. it already has some budget issues. i talked to people's gas and they were expected to see natural gas usage at its highest level in ten years. so that could hit some consumers in the pocketbook if this lasts too long. fortunately, we're seeing fairly cheap natural gas prices, so hopefully that won't hit consumers too badly. >> diane try to stay warm. >>> how best to help americans who have been out of work for more than six months, why some say extending unemployment benefits is not the way to do it. and technology is changing the way we shop and the way we do business. one of the top mind
, but the temperatures tomorrow morning not nearly as cold. >> dave warren thank you very much. diane eastabrook is in suburban chicago not only cold but also very, very dangerous. >> reporter: that's right, dell, it is very dangerous if you are standing out here and not covered up you could get frostbite or hypothermia within 10 minutes. we have been checking at the hospitals and so for there have been about 20 weather-related injuries 7 or 8 are due to frostbite or hypothermia. the rest are slips and falls. this shelter had 1, 080 people inside last night, and that is a record for them, and that's good news. one of the things we're concerned about later is traffic. people getting in traffic accidents. dell? >> diane eastabrook thank you very much. joining us from maywood, illinois where it is very, very cold. the windy city saying they are hoping they don't live up to their name today. >>> still ahead, the first u.s. city to ban frac-ing. >>> plus an incredible story of an man who spent nearly three days floating on a log stranded in this the middle of the ocean. >>> welcome back to al jazeera
. we are hoping to see that. >> diane, when you say a little bit warmer, what exactly are you talking about there in the windy city and where it is windy. >> we are looking at the weather getting up to maybe up to the low teens tomorrow and actually they are talking about it being in the mid 30s here over the weekend. so a lot of this cold air is moving out and we are going to see for what this week is considered balmy temperatures by the weekend and melting some of the snow. diane, thank you so much. get back inside and contain the enthusiasm for the warmer temperature. >> we are live in new york city's penn station and travel is a concern? >> yes, it is a concern here. what is interesting about the weather system, it is not really bringing in snow, not bringing in the ice to the northeast, just bitterly cold temperatures. it is hoovering around zero degrees in new york city and that is a record set in 1896 and it was 4 degrees back then and 6 degrees then and 4 degrees today. yesterday in new york, in the 50s. so temperatures plunged nearly 60 degrees in just 24 hours and that is ca
forward please. >> my name is diane erlick and i have a question about the self funded epo and similar to the current plan. does this mean for instance the paperwork for the individuals that have plan one have to do would fall on the individual -- would fall on us at kaiser if you choose that plan? for the people in plan one they have to submit all of the paperwork to medicare and all that stuff. would we then be doing that with kaiser and would the people actives doing the paperwork that they do to submit to the insurance company? >> no. absolutely not. i'm sorry. absolutely not. for the member it would be invisible. this funding mechanism would be invisible to you so if we didn't tell you wouldn't know we changed the funding. >> okay. just to comment on what richard said about being in the hospital. it's not just kaiser. there has been a lot written about that. i get a lot of these newsletters. it's all hospitals. there's a great deal of confusion about that and none of the big hospital chains have been very honest about that. >> thank you. all right. there is a motion t
tomorrow evening. good night. >>> good evening. thanks for joining us. i'm diane dwyer. >>> the san jose fire department tonight is urging people to be on high alert, following a string of fires in the downtown area including one early this morning. investigators believe most of the fires were deliberately set. nbc bay area's kimberly tere joins us from the scene of the latest fire with more. >> reporter: diane, i'll show you the damage caused by that most recent fire on east st. john's street here. investigators say that all of the fires have been set on the exterior of the buildings and all have been fast moving, putting both residents and firefighters at risk. so far, there have been no serious injuries or deaths. but firefighters are concerned there could be, if the suspected arsonist is not caught. a $10,000 reward is now being offered for the arrest and conviction of the person or persons responsible for starting these fires. a sketch of a person of interest has also been released. investigators say it is based on witness descriptions and also images taken from surveillance cameras
. diane eastabrook reports. >> reporter: aknee sha is always putting her four-year-old daughter to the test even even at snack time. >> do you see how many gram crackers there are? >> one, two, three four. >> reporter: she learned how to improve her daughter's vocabulary through a pilot program the program helps kids improve their vocabulary by teaching their parents different ways to talk to them. newal was astonished by her daughter's quick progress. >> i want to say maybe by the fifth of sixth week, my daughter called something ridiculous. >> reporter: this doctor specializing in implants for the hearing impaired developed 30 million words after noticing that some of her low-income patients didn't progress as well following surgery. >> i realized it had nothing to do with their hearing loss, but rather the language environment they were being exposed to early on. and that difference almost always fell along socioeconomic lines. >> reporter: two psychologists found that three year olds who interacted more with their parents and exposed to more words were better in kindergarte
a government helicopter from a scene from the sky and diane hit the capital damascus the aide to keep the government of prime minister to tie it angela is really twenty high level prosecution spread the paste. it takes is committed to head to the tt sherry which headline says is embroiled in a plot still wanted mine to the corruption allegations. the high council of judges and prosecutors handed out by justice minister bikie abbas tag says the chief prosecution and seven of his deputies in istanbul are among the case has been reassigned these changes come in day out of the government tightened its grip on the panel that appoints all judges and prosecute as agile as they see one of the biggest crises of his team ethic he is and how lah. a huge corruption investigation became in mid december with a string of high profile the rest including the sons of two cabinet ministers. meadow was called to prayer but foreign stars and is staying on democracy. egypt more than ninety percent of referendum petition said yes to the new constitution for the country according to state media it's been pu
. i'm diane dwyer. tonight police in one san jose neighborhood are calling for changes after a teenage girl was hit and killed by a light rail train right in front of her school. 14-year-old danika garcia was riding her bike to delmar high school friday morning when she was hit. nbc bay area's kimberly terry joins us from the crossing at southwest expressway with more on what neighbors say has to change there. kimberly? >> reporter: diane, you mentioned the proximity between the school and where the accident happened so we want to show you that distance. in fact, this is the field behind delmar high school, and as you can see it butts right up against the light rail tracks. currently there are
philadelphia-- give it up for diane sharkey. what up, diane? >> nothin'. [giggles] excited to be here. >> nice. so happy to have you here. it's so great. you do so mu g
's highest court overturned the acquittal and ordered a new trial. she told d diane sawyer the new was devastating. >> i felt like, after crawling through a field of barbed wire and finally reaching what i thought was the end, it just turned out that it was the horizon. and i had another field of barbed wire that i had ahead of me to crawl through. >> reporter: but it won't end here. knox can appeal yet yet again to italy's supreme court. and if the guilty verdict is upheld, only then will the question of extradition be on the table. knox's parents say the ordeal has cost them everything. devastating them financially. for now, knox remains home in seattle, free. but with the dark cloud of a 28-year, 6-minute prison sentence hanging over her future. neal karlinsky, abc news, seattle. >> thanks to neal. >>> i want to bring in abc's chief legal affairs anchor, dan abrams. is there any way the united states will let the italians drag her back in prison in italy? >> in most cases, the answer would be yes. in italy, she is a convicted murderer. in this case, i think it's unlikely. i don'
>> hi there, diane. folks are already set to gather. lots of people who remember this young woman as a woman who cherished mother hood and only had 11 weeks to mother her 3-month-old son before the tragedy that struck them both last night. >> he has the fa oif an angel and a name that means savior. but his great ant says he's the one in need of saving tonight. salvador is fighting for his life after the pedestrian accident that claimed the life of his 19-year-old mother and sent his 17-year-old aunt to the hospital. >> it's just -- oh. it feels like a bad dream and we're going to wake up and it's going to be over. but obviously we woke up and it's not over. >> fremont police say the 19-year-old mother was holding her infant soon when she and her 17-year-old sister got out of the car they were riding in and attempted to cross the street outside a crosswalk. >> we believe that there was an argument that took place inside the vehicle, that the two young ladies were inside of. and as a result of that argument, they both exited their vehicle with the 3-month-old baby boy. and as they w
it. abc's meteorologist ginger zee is tracking it for us. >> reporter: diane, so many folks waiting for it, maybe starting to see the first flakes. it is about to get rocking. i want to take you through the time line of how this storm affects most of the east coast. of course you're seeing the radar full in parts of pennsylvania, ohio. look where the storm animation takes us here. time wise tonight, 8:00 p.m. until about 4:00 a.m. that the bulk of this snow will fall. by tomorrow afternoon it is gone. behind it it's very cold air. how much snow are we talking? remember this is not just snow but in some places intense wind. that's why we have blizzard warnings in parts of long island, the cape, coastal maine, parts of new hampshire. you'll be in the six to ten inch range in the pink. some places will be a foot and a half locally. then the cold, i mentioned it once but you've got to see it again. we're talking about the coldest air we have seen since the mid '90s in some places. look at those high temperatures. that's right. i said high temperatures as minneapolis is at 9 below on sat
. >> veteran kill falk and wife diane had $1 million for boulder crest retreat in virginia. they assumed a nonprofit retreat would be exempt from property taxes. instead they got first pass of roughly 20,000 dollar tax bill. >> got a bill for 10,000 dollars a month ago. we are doing work that is going on that the conti can't afford to deliver and the state can't afford to deliver and the federal government isn't going to deliver. >> he is hoping he does not have to pay the second half of the 20,000 dollar bill. >> just within 2013 alone health and human services admitting to improperly spending billions of your tax dollars. diane macedo is here to explain what happened. >> hi answerly. the u.s. department of health and human services estimates it improperly spent more than $65 billion in tax payer funds in 2013 including roughly 60 billion in payments to medicare and medicaid. according to the department's fiscal year 2013 financial report last year's total of $365 billion of erroneous payments is up and hhs estima n 64.3 billion of the payments were related to medicare or medicaid. whi
they'll avoid flooding as the big warm-up comes. diane? >> still braving the cold for us. thank you, linzie janis. >>> how fast is the cold air retreating? abc meteorologist ginger zee with the forecast. ginger? >> even faster than it came in. that's great news for a lot of people. we've all been suffering. a lot of folks. we looked at that length yesterday. 2,100 miles, if i get it right. and now, it's less than half of that. closer to 1,000. so, it is going quickly. and the numbers go with it. let me show you this, diane, because so many folks want to know, when do i start to be tolerable? well, by thursday, looking at 30s there in that aqua color. 40s and 50s. it pushes to the north. and friday into saturday, we go above average. for so many folks, mid-atlantic and northeast. >> boy, that looks great. so, who gets the prize for the longest time in the cold? >> yeah, the longest time, the biggest population. we're going to give it to green bay because right after that game that so many of us were watching, they did not have the coldest nfl game. but they got close. and then, right
, with a public apology accepted, the mayor said, i guess i'm on his radar now. diane? >> all right. jim avila reporting. thank you, jim. >>> we turn, now, to the anchor of "this week," co-anchor of "good morning america," george stephanopoulos. so, is it over? >> it's definitely not over, diane. but the press conference was close to textbook. the apology came out of the gate. it was unequivocal. it was unhedged. he took action. he exhausted all of the questions over those two hours. this is not over. there's still criminal investigations to go here. there's inspector general investigations to go here. there's subpoenas. a lot more information could come out on this. christie's denial has to hold up. >> but here's the question. he said, of course, he didn't know anything about it. but should you have to tell your staff you would be appalled if commuters are hurt? >> definitely not. and that's the big, big problem here. there's somehow a culture here that told people this was okay. it also undercut his credentials as a bipartisan. it undercuts his credentials as a manager. and there's great opp
fire with more. >> reporter: diane, i'll show you the damage caused by that most recent fire on east st. john's street here. investigators say that all of the fires have been set on the exterior of the buildings and all have been fast moving, putting both residents and firefighters at risk. so far, there have been no serious injuries or deaths. but firefighters are concerned there could be, if the suspected arsonist is not caught. a $10,000 reward is now being offered for the arrest and conviction of the person or persons responsible for starting these fires. a sketch of a person of interest has also been released. investigators say it is based on witness descriptions and also images taken from surveillance cameras. he is described as a white or hispanic man, 25 to 40 years old, 6 feet to 6'2", weighing approximately 160 to 180 pounds with dark medium length hair and wearing distinctive large frame glasses. the fires have been set in a small geographic area in the early morning hours and are similar in nature. >> at this time, we can confirm that eight of these fires have been intention
was running inside with a gun? too late to do much good. diane? >> all right, ryan. >>> and next, we want to take you to a part of the country, tonight, so dry that any spark can light a fuse. today we learned that 2013 was the single-driest year in the history of california. and now, we're going to show you a hidden ghost town once underwater that's suddenly reappeared. abc's david wright is there. >> reporter: wind-whipped fire and bone-dry brush. a potentially killer combination. in the past 24 hours, blazes have threatened communities near sacramento and the pacific palisades, above santa monica beach. multimillion-dollar homes there saved, just in time. it's been the driest year since they started keeping records in california, during the gold rush. and this is the third-straight year of drought. at this point, california is one, big tinderbox. no precipitation means no snow in the mountains. this is what the sierra nevada looked like a year ago. this is today. ski resorts are struggling for business. those aren't skiers out on the slopes. they're bears that should be hibernating, se
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